Speech
Therapy

Occupational
Therapy

Physical
Therapy

Our Temecula Valley Clinic is a complete adult clinic, offering Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy and Speech-Language Pathology. Our therapists are all licensed by the State of California and hold mandated certifications in their specific disciplines. Our therapists all share the same commitment to high-quality care and result-driven therapy.

We offer a variety of services to meet the needs of our patients:

  • Physical Therapy (PT)
  • Occupational Therapy (OT)
  • Applied Behavior
  • Analysis(ABA)
  • Speech-Language Therapy (ST)
  • Swallowing / Dysphagia Therapy
  • Therapy for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
  • Physical Rehabilitation due to war injuries
  • Neurogenic Rehabilitation for diseases like Parkinson’s & MS

Get Started in Temecula Valley

                     Our highly skilled, compassionate clinicians offer rehabilitation services including Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy and Speech Therapy.  
               To make an appointment or learn more about our services, contact us today! (951) 303-8255

SPEECH THERAPY

All new patients must be assessed before beginning treatment; typically an assessment is completed in one 60 minute session, though a second session may be required for more complex cases. An assessment is comprehensive and will evaluate speech, language, oral motor function, voice and fluency. The clinician will ask questions regarding relevant medical history, complete an oral motor exam and administer standardized testing to assess the patient’s speech and language.

You should come prepared with all required forms  including insurance information, case history form and physician’s order stating, “ST evaluation and treatment.” You should also bring any relevant medical documents and copies of speech-language assessments completed in the past.

Yes; if you are planning to bill your speech language therapy to your insurance company, you will need a referral. Please contact our billing department if you need more information.

Most insurance companies require that the therapy be “medically necessary.” Your therapist can determine if your therapy is medically necessary during the initial evaluation. Please refer to the insurance section for information about which types of insurance we accept; if you have further questions, please contact our billing department

Please bring any copies of evaluations from specialists and other therapists that would assist the therapist in coordinating care and determining goals of therapy. Please bring any equipment that you may use, such as, crutches, walker, wheelchair, braces/splints, or communication device. At your initial evaluation appointment, please bring your doctor’s prescription, any applicable insurance referral and your insurance card.

The physical therapy evaluation is a documentation employed by a physical therapist during the first encounter with the patient. It is also called “initial examination or initial evaluation.” It is completed in one visit and takes about an hour. Included in the PT initial evaluation are the following: Examination This includes information obtained from history, review of systems, PT diagnostic tests and measurements. Diagnosis Here, the level of impairment, activity or mobility and any participation restriction is indicated as determined by the physical therapist. Prognosis This part may include documentation of the predicted level of improvement (goals) that may be attained through the proposed treatment interventions. It also includes the duration or amount of time required to reach those goals. Prognosis documentation is usually included in the plan of care and is not necessarily a separate document. Plan of Care The plan of care of the initial evaluation or examination is usually stated in general terms. It includes the goals, which are stated in measurable terms; planned treatment interventions; proposed frequency and duration of therapy required to attain the goals; and discharge plans as determined by the therapist.

Our goal is to improve our patient’s oral motor, mastication, and swallowing abilities as well as improve his/her nutritional status. Swallowing goals may include:

  • Improve oral motor functioning required for mastication and swallowing.
  • Improve bolus control and timing of swallow reflex.
  • Decrease signs and symptoms of aspiration.
  • Decrease pocketing or oral residue.
  • Increase P.O. intake (food by mouth) to meet the nutritional needs of the patient.
  • Increase acceptance of a variety of foods and food textures.
  • Eliminate G-Tube dependency.
  • Eliminate NG-Tube dependency.
  • Decrease choking/gagging during meals.
  • Teach compensatory strategies to decrease risk of aspiration.
  • Caregiver training for carryover of skills to home environment.

As adults, we often forget how much we rely up our ability to speak to get through our day. However, when our ability to speak or understand language becomes impaired, the effect can be devastating. At  our Temecula Valley Clinic, we help adults who unfortunately have suffered from a lost of their speech, language and/or swallowing. Some have suffered from a stroke or Cardiovascular Accident (CVA), Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Parkinson’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis (MS) or some other neurological disorder. Others are experiencing vocal nodules, vocal polyps, Spasmodic Dysphonia, or other disorders of the voice. Regardless of the cause, we have the individualized program to help.  

Dysphagia is the medical term for impaired swallowing function. A person may experience dysphagia after a neurological diagnosis such CVA, or stroke, Parkinson’s disease, or Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). However, sometimes patients develop dysphagia as part of the aging process or for no apparent reason. Signs and Symptoms of dysphagia are:

  • Difficulty chewing, or masticating, their food
  • Frequent gagging on food
  • Coughing or choking before, during or after swallowing
  • Sensation of food getting caught in the throat
  • Running nose and watery eyes while eating
  • Frequent throat clearing
  • Food or liquid falling out of the mouth before it is swallowed
  • Pocketing, or food remaining in cheeks
  • Oral residue left in mouth after swallowing
  • “Clunking” sounds while swallowing

Our speech and language pathologists will assess the patient’s oral structures, mastication, swallowing abilities, risk for aspiration, cognitive status, and endurance. We consult with the patient’s other specialists, such as nutritionists, ENTs, and GI physicians to ensure that our therapy approach is supporting all the needs of the patient. After an evaluation, we might recommend swallowing therapy, a Modified Barium Swallow study (MBS), or diet modifications.

 

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

Occupational Therapists and Occupational Therapy Assistants help people across the lifespan participate in the things they want and need to do through the therapeutic use of everyday activities, or ADLs (Activities of Daily Living). These include getting dressed, food preparation, self care and work

OT is beneficial in treating a variety of patients such as those with after effects of a stroke (CVA), Multiple Sclerosis, Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) and Parkinson’s disease for example. It is also beneficial following injuries, such has hand therapy.

First a comprehensive evaluation will be performed and mutually agreed upon goals will be set for each individual patient. Then the OT and COTA will provide exercises that are functional and meaningful to the patient in order to address the ongoing deficits. For example, if a patient has experienced a stroke decreasing the use of one arm, the patient will most likely perform exercises to strengthen the arm, regain functional movement and practice real life skills such as grooming, preparing food, dressing, and regaining functional mobility.

Chances are more than just the arm is affected when a loved one has a stroke. Occupational Therapists utilize many techniques to facilitate returned functional use of an extremity following a stroke. OT’s use meaningful and functional activities combined with weight bearing, strengthening of the trunk and upper extremity, range of motion and increased awareness of the limb to achieve the greatest level return of independence for activities of daily living.

Absolutely. Patient and caregiver education is a priority in treatment. You will receive personal customized exercises to do at home as well as suggestions to make tasks easier and more effective considering any deficits.

Open communication with your physician is of the highest importance at TVTS. You will receive a comprehensive evaluation at the start of your care and progress statements periodically to your physician or other health care professionals you may see. Our team of speech and language pathologists, physical and occupational therapist coordinate your plan of care in house as well. We believe in treating the “whole person”, not just the “parts!”

Occupational therapists work with individuals who are experiencing difficulty with activities of daily living or ADLs. ADLs include getting dressed, preparing meals, personal hygiene and care, and work activities. Often these deficits are caused by a neurological disorder or disease. These include CVA (stroke), Parkinson’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis, ALS, Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), and Spinal cord injury. Occupational therapy is also required by the geriatric population as they go through normal adult aging. These include (but are not limited to) arthritis, osteoporosis, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and balance disorders. Occupational therapy helps patients perform daily tasks at home, at school, at work and during recreation.

At our Temecula Valley Clinic, all patients receive an initial evaluation. This evaluation includes a review of the patient’s medical history, a review of the patient’s symptoms, and OT diagnostic tests and measurements. An individual plan of care is developed which includes the goals, planned treatment interventions, proposed frequency and duration of therapy required to attain the goals, and discharge plans as determined by the therapist.

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Neurological injuries are problems associated with the central nervous system, primarily the brain and spinal cord. People with neurologic injuries or impairments often require more hands on treatment and longer recovery times. We provide intensive rehabilitation for clients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), stroke, MS, Parkinson’s disease and spinal cord injury among other diagnosis.

Normal aging does not require physical therapy, however many of the conditions associated with osteoporosis, fear of falling, limited walking ability and deconditioning/weakness are not normal aging and can be addressed through skilled physical therapy. Additionally, our staff is aware of the issues with hearing loss, decreased vision and loss of sensation that can complicate rehabilitation for many older adults.

These includes CVA (stroke), Parkinson’s disease, Multiple sclerosis, ALS, Tramatic Brain injury (TBI), spinal cord injury to name a few. Common problems of patients with neurological disorders include muscle weakness, paralysis, difficulty walking, functional and balance deficits and loss of independence. Therapists work with patients to improve areas of dysfunction. Neurological physical therapists work with individuals who have neurological disorder or disease.

Geriatric physical therapy covers numerous issues concerning people as they go through normal adult aging. These include (but are not limited to) arthritis, osteoporosis, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and balance disorders. Geriatric physical therapists develop individualized program to help restore mobility, reduce pain and increase fitness.

Please bring any copies of evaluations from specialists and other therapists that would assist the therapist in coordinating care and determining goals of therapy. Please bring any equipment that you may use, such as, crutches, walker, wheelchair, braces/splints, or communication device. At your initial evaluation appointment, please bring your doctor’s prescription, any applicable insurance referral and your insurance card.

The physical therapy evaluation is a documentation employed by a physical therapist during the first encounter with the patient. It is also called “initial examination or initial evaluation.” It is completed in one visit and takes about an hour. Included in the PT initial evaluation are the following: Examination This includes information obtained from history, review of systems, PT diagnostic tests and measurements. Diagnosis Here, the level of impairment, activity or mobility and any participation restriction is indicated as determined by the physical therapist. Prognosis This part may include documentation of the predicted level of improvement (goals) that may be attained through the proposed treatment interventions. It also includes the duration or amount of time required to reach those goals. Prognosis documentation is usually included in the plan of care and is not necessarily a separate document. Plan of Care The plan of care of the initial evaluation or examination is usually stated in general terms. It includes the goals, which are stated in measurable terms; planned treatment interventions; proposed frequency and duration of therapy required to attain the goals; and discharge plans as determined by the therapist.

Physical therapists work with individuals who are experiencing difficulty with physical movement, including difficulty walking, muscle weakness, muscle paralysis, loss of independence and balance deficits. Often these deficits are caused by a neurological disorder or disease. These include CVA (stroke), Parkinson’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis, ALS, Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), and Spinal cord injury. Physical therapy is also required by the geriatric population as they go through normal adult aging. These include (but are not limited to) arthritis, osteoporosis, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and balance disorders. Geriatric physical therapists develop individualized program to help restore mobility, reduce pain and increase fitness.

At our Temecula Valley Clinic, all patients receive an initial evaluation. This evaluation includes a review of the patient’s medical history, a review of the patient’s symptoms, and PT diagnostic tests and measurements. An individual plan of care is developed which includes the goals, planned treatment interventions, proposed frequency and duration of therapy required to attain the goals, and discharge plans as determined by the therapist

Visit our Temecula Valley Clinic

                                      Temecula Valley Clinic
                                       41769 Enterprise Circle N Suite 104 & 105
                                       Temecula, CA
                                       Phone: (951) 303-8255
                                       

Request an Appointment Today!